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African Safaris://Linkwasha Camp – March 2018

Linkwasha Camp – March 2018

Linkwasha Camp - March 2018 | Taga Safaris

Climate and Landscape
Lush vegetation in various hues of green, rich with life – in short, this was the scenery of March! Linkwasha was surrounded by a picturesque landscape composed of tall grass, thickets of blue bushes and canopies of trees with full foliage, creating an air of enigma and the endless possibility of lurking wildlife.

Wildlife
Fortunately the 12 lions of Ngamo appeared from out of the bushes and were spotted on several occasions resting in the shade of trees or trekking across the plains in search of their next meal. Butch and Nqwele were no strangers to the guests of Linkwasha either. The clear calls of the lion brothers filled the night air of March, as the two patrolled their territorial area from Scott’s Pan to Ngamo Plains. A rare sighting that captured the hearts of our guests was the introduction of cubs to each other by the two lionesses that frequent the Makalolo Pan area. The initial hesitation and uncertainty amongst the cubs ended in playful fighting, frolicking in the tall grass and growing familiarity.

Linkwasha Camp - March 2018 | Taga Safaris

Linkwasha Camp – March 2018

Only half of the infamous pair of cheetah brothers frequented the Linkwasha Camp area during March. The single male remains a predator to be reckoned with as he was spotted up in a tree stalking the resident impala and then going in for an attempted kill near Tent 9. We presume in fact that the other brother has been killed, possibly by a baboon.

Scott’s Pan continues to be an antelope sanctuary, with sable, eland and roan sighted foraging away in the peripheral forests. The sprawling Ngamo Plains provided the stage for many a spectacle over the course of the month. Herds of wildebeest grazed serenely for as far as the eye could see, their young calves nestled in the centre of the group, away from any potential danger. The tall and lanky frames of giraffe lined the edge of the plains, the dense vegetation behind them providing ample cover and protection. Zebra and impala roamed the vast vlei, nibbling on the nutrient-rich grasses that have transformed this desolate dust bowl into a herbivore’s haven.

Linkwasha Camp - March 2018 | Taga Safaris

Linkwasha Camp – March 2018

Birds and Birding
This month we witnessed the feeding frenzy of migratory birds as they start building up fat reserves to fuel their journey back to their wintering homes. The majority of migratory raptors have already left the plains, leaving mostly storks and smaller birds behind.

The red-backed shrike was a ‘frequent flyer’ this month, enjoying the many insects still about due to the late summer rains.

The normally nocturnal Verreaux’s eagle-owl become a fan favourite in daylight, being seen perched on branches along our game-drive roads on several occasions during the month.

February’s heavy rains have not had a chance to filter down into the aquifers below, and so much of Ngamo Plains is still home to many water birds, including Egyptian geese, red-billed teals, knob-billed ducks and the occasional crowned crane seen drifting between the reeds while saddle-billed storks and grey herons stalk around the periphery.

Linkwasha Camp - March 2018 | Taga Safaris

Linkwasha Camp – March 2018

2018-11-12T05:29:44+00:00May 1st, 2018|Africa Travel News|
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